A Profile of Injuries Suffered by Female Soldiers Serving in the Australian Army | BMC Public Health

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A dataset of 12,385 occupational health and safety incident records was received by ADF data custodians, for incidents reported by Army personnel as having occurred during the two-year study period. Of these, 338 were removed because they involved injuries to foreign military personnel, a member of the public or a volunteer, and another 363 were removed because incident records did not indicate that the affected personnel were army personnel (data for this gaze was missing). Another 35 records were suppressed as they did not report meaningful incident data and 2899 were suppressed as they were classified as a report of a near miss, exposure, hazardous occurrence or accident. a death, rather than an injury. This left 8750 injured, of which 8636 were classified as minor injuries (not = 1766 affecting female soldiers, not = 6870 soldiers) and 114 seriously wounded (not = 19 affecting female soldiers, not= 95 male soldiers).

After accounting for the respective population sizes, the injury incidence rate for minorinjuries was 20.75 minor injuries per 100 soldiers per year among women and 13.60 per 100 soldiers per year among men. Overall, female soldiers suffered minor injuries at a higher rate than male soldiers, with an associated IRR for minor injuries of 1.53 [95% CI = 1.46–1.60]. Similarly, the injury incidence rate for seriousserious injuries was 0.22 serious injuries per 100 soldiers per year for female soldiers and 0.19 serious injuries per 100 soldiers per year for male soldiers, giving a serious injury IRR of 1.19 [95% CI = 0.73–1.94]. This indicates that there was no significant gender difference in the incidence of seriouswounds.

Minor injuries

The distribution of injuries by commonly reported body locations differed only slightly between the sexes. The region of the body most often affected by minor injuries differed between women and men, with the ankle being the most frequent region in women and the knee in men (Table 1). A total of 14.4% of reported minor injuries involved the ankle among female soldiers, while 10.8% involved the knee. This contrasts with 12.8% minor knee injuries among male soldiers, with a similar proportion of 12.5% ​​minor injuries affecting the ankle. The lower back was the third most common site of minor injury for both men and women, accounting for 6.9% and 3.2% of reported minor injuries, respectively. The five most common anatomical locations of minor injuries recorded among female soldiers in Table 1 accounted for 43% of all minor injuries reported among female soldiers and 44% of all minor injuries reported among male soldiers. Female soldiers had a higher minor injury incidence rate in all 5 major anatomical locations, with the exception of the shoulder, where minor injury incidence rates were not significantly different between genders.

Table 1 Most commonly reported body locations for minor injuries in females, compared to male Australian soldiers

The same trends for the most reported types of minor injuries were seen among female and male soldiers, as shown in Table 2. Over 56% of minor injuries reported among female soldiers and 55% of injuries reported among male soldiers were tissue in nature. . The second most commonly reported nature of minor injury among female soldiers was broken bones, while lacerations were the second most common nature of minor injury among men. Women had a higher reported incidence rate for minor injuries in all five major categories of nature of injury, with the exception of lacerations, for which the rate was not significantly different from that of men.

Table 2 The most frequently reported natures of minor injuries among female Australian soldiers, compared to male Australian soldiers

The most commonly reported minor injury mechanisms among female soldiers are shown in Table 3, along with the rates at which they also occurred among male soldiers, for comparison. For both men and women, falls were the most common mechanism, followed by muscle stress without handling objects and muscle stress while handling objects. Women suffered a higher rate of minor injuries than men, in all 5 major mechanism categories.

Table 3 Most Frequently Reported Minor Injury Mechanisms in Females, Compared to Male Australian Soldiers

Physical training was the most common activity in which minor injuries occurred for both women and men, accounting for nearly 34.4% and 29.5% of reported injuries for women and men, respectively. male soldiers (Table 4). This was followed by combat training and sports. The most frequently undertaken task for a minor injury during physical training (PT) was similar for men and women, with running (♀ not= 111, 18.3% PT minor injuries; ♂ not= 312.15.4%), followed by circuits (♀ not= 55, 9.1%; ♂ not= 186, 9.2%) being the two most common tasks associated with minor injuries within physiotherapy. The third most common was the obstacle course for women (not= 41; 6.8%) and cardio training for men (not= 144; 7.1%). Within the sports category, soccer was the most common type of sport for which minor injuries were reported (not= 22; 17.9% of minor sports injuries), followed by volleyball (not= 16; 13.0%) then netball (not= 15; 12.2%) among female staff. Among male staff, soccer was also the most common sport in which injuries occurred (not= 152; 21.9% of minor sports injuries) followed by tactile football (not= 105; 15.1%) then rugby union (not= 80; 11.5%). Sport was the only activity with similar minor injury rates for female and male soldiers.

Table 4 Most frequently reported activities causing minor injuries among female Australian soldiers, compared to male Australian soldiers

Serious injuries

The body locations where SIs occurred most frequently in female soldiers are detailed in Table 5. The most common body location for SIs in female personnel was the circulatory system, and this was much less common in female soldiers. injured men (Table 5). Two of the five circulatory system SIs in women were due to heat stress/stroke, the other three were due to exposure to biological factors or chemicals. Among female soldiers, the forearm was the second most common area of ​​the body affected by serious injuries, and the two injuries reported to this area of ​​the body were fractures. The proportion of serious injuries in men that involved the forearm was not significantly different from that of women. Other body sites were implicated in no more than one serious injury each in female soldiers, and included ankle, fingers, thumb, head, several systemic conditions, respiratory system, heart, pelvis and “not entered”. The body sites of two serious wounds in the female soldiers were not specified. The second, third, and fourth most common body locations for SI in men have been specified as “systemic” (not= 8, 8.4% of serious injuries), the shoulder (not= 7.7.4%) and the knee (not= 6, 6.3%); none of these body sites caused more than one serious injury to female soldiers. Serious systemic injuries reported by male soldiers were usually poisonings, bites and stings, and serious injuries affecting the shoulder and knee were usually dislocations, fractures or torn ligaments.

Table 5 Most commonly reported locations of serious injury among female Australian soldiers, compared to male Australian soldiers

Fractures were the most common nature of SI for female and male soldiers (Table 6). Lacerations and heat stress/stroke were the second most common serious injuries among female soldiers. Other types of injuries accounted for no more than one serious injury each among female soldiers. None of the specified types of severe injury were experienced significantly more by either sex.

Table 6 Most commonly reported types of serious injury among female Australian soldiers, compared to male Australian soldiers

The most common mechanism for IS in female soldiers was falls, which was also the second most common mechanism for serious injury in male soldiers (.

Table 7). The most common among men was contact with objects (not= 17) which is not listed in Table 7. Being trapped by objects such as doors or windows was the second most common mechanism of SI in women, which was due to complicated fractures fingers when closing windows or doors. Heat exposure, the third most common mechanism of SI in women, was also relatively common in men (Table 7).

Table 7 Most commonly reported mechanisms of serious injury in females, compared to male Australian soldiers

The most frequently reported activity causing SI in female soldiers was “eating,” with both resulting injuries being due to food poisoning (Table 8). The most common activity causing SI in men was physical training (15.8%), followed by combat training (14.7%) in men. These and other activities accounted for no more than one SI each among female soldiers.

Table 8 Most frequently reported activities causing serious injury among female Australian soldiers, compared to male Australian soldiers
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