Top GOP senators talk about legislative priorities in Louisville

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School safety, youth violence and workforce development will be among the top issues state lawmakers will face this summer in Frankfurt during interim hearings ahead of the 2023 legislative session. Julie Raque Adams, who spoke Friday at the Waterfront Botanical Gardens in Louisville. They were there to tout the $1.5 million in public funds for the new Japanese Gardens, which will be under construction this summer. WLKY News told them about what lies ahead in the interim hearings. School Safety The mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, was the 27th school shooting in 2022, according to Education Week. This puts school safety at the forefront of many parents’ minds and is one of the reasons the Interim Joint Education Committee will review the Safe and Resilient Schools Act 2019. , adopted after a school shooting in Marshall County. Lawmakers want to know how far progressing school districts have made and what remains to be done. “We need to make sure that when school starts in August that our kids are safe and now is the time to really hone in on those responses,” Raque Adams said. That could mean disputes over whether to force districts to place armed school resources. officers on campus. Many districts have struggled to fund ORS, and the Jefferson County Board of Education has debated their effectiveness. Workforce development Labor shortages continue to vex employers and have made themselves felt in two critical areas – health care and education. Earlier this month, lawmakers heard from the state education commissioner about the teacher shortage in Kentucky and they’ll likely revisit the topic, Stivers said. They will also look for ways to bridge the skills gap between employers and vocational students. find, he said. “We need to look at a bigger collaborative effort between technical schools, KCTCS, our colleges and universities, because it’s not going to be the traditional four-year degree that a Ford or some other entity will look at.” he declares. Juvenile Detention Center State lawmakers also heard from Louisville officials in another preliminary hearing on funding for the reopening of the city’s juvenile detention center. Lawmakers have asked for more information and may bring those officials back for another hearing. “I think the state knows it’s time to make this investment, but we want to make sure those dollars are spent in the most appropriate and effective way.” Louisville is asking for $1 million for renovations to the center, on Jefferson Street next to the two courthouses, as well as $4 million a year in operating costs, Raque Adams said. The city closed the juvenile detention center in 2019 during a budget crisis. Since then, Louisville has relied on a small regional juvenile detention center on La Grange Road or sent young offenders to centers in other counties. Many have complained that minors are not detained at all, creating the feeling among young people that there will be no consequences for their crimes. Recently, Metro Louisville opened a youth transition center in the former detention center to provide services to youth charged with a crime.

School safety, youth violence and workforce development will be among the top issues state lawmakers will face this summer in Frankfurt during interim hearings ahead of the 2023 legislative session.

That’s according to two of the top GOP senators, Senate Speaker Robert Stivers and Senate Majority Caucus Chair Julie Raque Adams, who spoke Friday at the Waterfront Botanical Gardens in Louisville.

They were there to tout $1.5 million in public funds for the new Japanese Gardens, which will be under construction this summer.

WLKY News told them about what is happening in the interim hearings.

school safety

The mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas was the 27th school shooting in 2022, according to Education Week.

School safety is a top concern for many parents and it’s one of the reasons the Interim Joint Education Committee will review the Safe and Resilient Schools Act 2019, passed after a shooting in a Marshall County School.

Lawmakers want to know what progress school districts have made and what remains to be done.

“We need to make sure that when school starts in August that our kids are safe and now is the time to really refine those responses,” Raque Adams said.

That could mean disputes over whether to force districts to place armed school resource officers on campuses. Many districts have struggled to fund ORS, and the Jefferson County Board of Education has debated their effectiveness.

Workforce development

Labor shortages continue to frustrate employers and have worsened in two critical areas: health care and education.

Earlier this month, lawmakers heard from the state education commissioner about the teacher shortage in Kentucky and they’ll likely revisit the topic, Stivers said.

They will also look for ways to bridge the gap between the skills employers are looking for and vocational students can find, he said.

“We need to look at a bigger collaborative effort between technical schools, KCTCS, our colleges and universities, because it’s not going to be the traditional four-year degree that a Ford or some other entity will look at,” he said. declared.

Juvenile detention center

State lawmakers also heard from Louisville officials in another preliminary hearing on funding for the reopening of the city’s juvenile detention center.

Lawmakers have asked for more information and may bring those officials back for another hearing.

“We had to sort of get all the questions resolved and we need to have those answers before the state makes this investment,” Raque Adams said. “I think the state knows it’s time to make this investment, but we want to make sure those dollars are spent in the most appropriate and effective way.”

Louisville is asking for $1 million for renovations to the center, on Jefferson Street next to the two courthouses, as well as $4 million a year in operating costs, Raque Adams said.

The city closed the juvenile detention center in 2019 during a budget crisis.

Since then, Louisville has relied on a small regional juvenile detention center on La Grange Road or sent young offenders to centers in other counties.

Many have complained that minors are not detained at all, creating a sense among young people that there will be no consequences for their crimes.

Recently, Metro Louisville opened a youth transition center in the former detention center to provide services to youth charged with a crime.

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